May
5
1:00pm 1:00pm

NON VIOLENCE FILM FESTIVAL 1-5 MAY 2017 PROGRAM, PEACE STUDIES - UNE

SWING KIDS, 1993 (110 mins) 

It’s 1939 and Nazi Germany has declared war on freedom, demanding conformity from its youth. But a group calling themselves ‘Swing Kids’ rebel with the ‘swing’ music from America and dare to stand up against the powerful forces around them. Each member of the group is forced to face some tough choices about right, wrong, and survival. Featuring Christian Bale and Barbara Hershey, SWING KIDS, is an inspirational and powerful story about finding the courage to fight for what you believe in. 

All films are FREE and begin at 1 pm. This is a School of Humanities initiative. With a focus on youth, this year’s festival is an opportunity to meet like-minded people and discuss important issues facing the world today.

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May
4
1:00pm 1:00pm

NON VIOLENCE FILM FESTIVAL 1-5 MAY 2017 PROGRAM, PEACE STUDIES - UNE

GIVE TREES A CHANCE, 1980 (47 minutes) 

This 1980 documentary tells the story of the first eco-blockade in the world - the Terania Creek forest protest in Australia in 1979. A historic event, it brought rainforest preservation into public consciousness and led to the formation of the Nightcap National Park. Narrated by Jack Thompson. This screening is followed by a discussion led by Dr Vanessa Bible, a lead researcher into non-violent activism and the Terania Creek blockade. 

All films are FREE and begin at 1 pm. This is a School of Humanities initiative. With a focus on youth, this year’s festival is an opportunity to meet like-minded people and discuss important issues facing the world today.

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May
3
1:00pm 1:00pm

NON VIOLENCE FILM FESTIVAL 1-5 MAY 2017 PROGRAM, PEACE STUDIES - UNE

 

 VJ BURMA, 2009 (85 minutes) 

Using smuggled footage, this multiple award winning documentary tells the story of the 2007 protests in Burma by thousands of monks. The acclaimed filmmaker, Anders Ostergaard, brings us close to Burma’s video journalists who insisted on keeping up the flow of news from the closed country despite risking torture and life in jail. ‘Joshua’, 27, is one of these young video journalists. 

 All films are FREE and begin at 1 pm. This is a School of Humanities initiative. With a focus on youth, this year’s festival is an opportunity to meet like-minded people and discuss important issues facing the world today.

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May
2
1:00pm 1:00pm

NON VIOLENCE FILM FESTIVAL 1-5 MAY 2017 PROGRAM, PEACE STUDIES - UNE

 

 THE WORM IS TURNING, 2015 (103 minutes) 

This is the story of how corporate agribusiness is taking over the world’s food production revealed through historical archival footage, and shows how this system is destroying people’s health, economies and the ecology of the world. 

Filmed on location in India, USA, Thailand, Indonesia and Australia THE WORM IS TURNING shows, through amazing examples of ecological farming, that in fact small ecological farms are more productive, they can feed more people better, and at the same time restore the environment. Young farmers are leading the way in many of these initiatives. 

 All films are FREE and begin at 1 pm. This is a School of Humanities initiative. With a focus on youth, this year’s festival is an opportunity to meet like-minded people and discuss important issues facing the world today.

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May
1
1:00pm 1:00pm

NON VIOLENCE FILM FESTIVAL 1-5 MAY 2017 PROGRAM, PEACE STUDIES - UNE

All films are FREE and begin at 1 pm. This is a School of Humanities initiative. With a focus on youth, this year’s festival is an opportunity to meet like-minded people and discuss important issues facing the world today.

 

 

 WE ARE THE GIANT, 2014 (88 minutes) 

WE ARE THE GIANT is the inspirational story of ordinary people’s struggle for freedom. Filmed largely in secret and sometimes at great risk, Emmy award-winning director, Greg Barker, delivers remarkable access as he documents six people from very different walks of life as they grapple with the agonizing dilemma at the heart of all struggles for justice and freedom. They must decide whether to take up arms and fight, or to advocate change through peace and non-violence. This film contains violent scenes. 

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Apr
21
4:00pm 4:00pm

Author Event with Michelle Morgan

Join us in celebrating the launch of Flying Through Clouds by Michelle Morgan.
This new offering from Michelle is a well researched coming-of-age novel. Rich in historical detail with a compelling mix of humour and drama, and a resilient and likable main character. This book will appeal to young adults and adults alike.

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Mar
18
10:30am10:30am

John Heffernan Book Launch

HOTAKA is the first book in the second Through My Eyes series from Allen & Unwin that examines natural disasters - a starkly realistic novel about the Japanese tsunami of March, 2011. It explores the impact of the disaster on one teenage boy, the introspective Hotaka, and to a lesser degree on his two best friends, feisty Sakura and tech-head Osamu. In doing this, the book also examines the huge social impact of the disaster on Hotaka's once beautiful little town of Omori-wan, utterly destroyed by the wave.  This is an uplifting book about hope and resilience in the face of loss, grief and tragedy, about the need people have for each other in times of adversity. On one level it is a simple human story of a boy facing the truth. Yet it is also a melding of many individual stories. In its broadest sense, HOTAKA is a tribute to the people of the Tohoku region for their amazing strength and capacity to help each other rise from the ashes and rebuild their lives. "I travelled to Japan to research HOTAKA, talking to a range of teenage students, as well as teachers and principals. This deepened my grasp of the huge personal and social impact of the 2011 Tohoku disaster, and helped me understand some of the complexities of Japanese culture." HOTAKA is suitable for readers from Upper Primary to Middle High School.

HOTAKA is the first book in the second Through My Eyes series from Allen & Unwin that examines natural disasters - a starkly realistic novel about the Japanese tsunami of March, 2011. It explores the impact of the disaster on one teenage boy, the introspective Hotaka, and to a lesser degree on his two best friends, feisty Sakura and tech-head Osamu. In doing this, the book also examines the huge social impact of the disaster on Hotaka's once beautiful little town of Omori-wan, utterly destroyed by the wave. 

This is an uplifting book about hope and resilience in the face of loss, grief and tragedy, about the need people have for each other in times of adversity. On one level it is a simple human story of a boy facing the truth. Yet it is also a melding of many individual stories. In its broadest sense, HOTAKA is a tribute to the people of the Tohoku region for their amazing strength and capacity to help each other rise from the ashes and rebuild their lives.

"I travelled to Japan to research HOTAKA, talking to a range of teenage students, as well as teachers and principals. This deepened my grasp of the huge personal and social impact of the 2011 Tohoku disaster, and helped me understand some of the complexities of Japanese culture."

HOTAKA is suitable for readers from Upper Primary to Middle High School.

Come and join us to hear more of this great book from John

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